Crazy Brave: A Memoir, paper ed

$21.95

In Crazy Brave: A Memoir by Joy Harjo a leading Native American voice, details her journey to becoming a poet, artist and musician. Born in Oklahoma, the end place of the Trail of Tears, Joy Harjo grew up learning to dodge an abusive stepfather by finding shelter in her imagination, a deep spiritual life, and connection with the natural world. She attended an Indian arts boarding school, where she nourished an appreciation for painting, music, and poetry; gave birth while still a teenager; and struggled on her own as a single mother, eventually finding her poetic voice.

Price: $21.95

Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community, paper ed

$16.00

Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community is 2013 title in the Penguin Library of American Indian History Series. Written by Ojibwe scholar Brenda Child the volume offers a wealth of information about the history of Ojibwe women in their communities from contact to present day. Focusing on the Ojibwe of Lake Superior and the Mississippi River the author employs the English translation for mindimooyehn (mature, older woman) one who holds things together as the title and main premise of the book.

Price: $16.00

Stolen Sisters: The Story of Two Missing Girls, Their Families and How Canada has Failed Indigenous Women, hardcover ed

$26.99

Stolen Sisters: The Story of Two Missing Girls, Their Families and How Canada has Failed Indigenous Women is the English language translation of Soeurs Volees: Enquete sur un feminicide au Canada. Originally published in 2014, Emmanuelle Walter's book examined the case of two Kitigan Zibi teenagers missing since September 2008.  Maisy Odjick and Shannon Alexander disappeared from their First Nation in western Quebec and have not been located. French journalist Walter spent two years investigating the national crisis of murdered and missing Indigenous girls and women.

Price: $26.99

Tekahionwake: E. Pauline Johnson's Writings on Native North America, paper ed

$19.95

Tekahionwake: E Pauline Johnson's Writings on Native North America edited by English professors Margery Fee and Dory Nason have assembled an anthology of poems, fiction, and nonfiction about the so-called Indigenous question as it was examined in the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries.  Emily Pauline Johnson, also known as Tekahionwake, is remarkable as one of a very few early North American Indigenous poets and fiction writers.

Price: $19.95

Women Play Lacrosse: A History of the International Field Game, hardcover ed

$29.95

Women Play Lacrosse: A History of the International Field Game is the 2015 title from Ancient Game Press, the publisher of Lacrosse: The Ancient Game. Compiled by co-authors Jim Calder and Ron Fletcher this title is unique because it puts together the 125 plus year history of the women's sport. Its intention is to document the significant female players, builders and outstanding moments in field lacrosse. The 96-page book contains brief chapters about the history of the sport in several countries including Scotland, England, Wales, U.S.A., Australia, and Canada.

Price: $29.95

The Land We Are: Artists and Writers Unsettle the Politics of Reconciliation, paper ed

$24.95

The Land We Are: Artists and Writers Unsettle the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada is a visually striking collection that combines innovative writing with images to explore how artists working across a variety of disciplines and media define, envision, and experience reconciliation. The contributors acknowledge reconciliation as contested terrain in the context of Canada as an ongoing colonial enterprise, a prominent narrative about Indigenous settler relations, and a catalyst for critical conversations about what social justice might look like.

Price: $24.95

Life Among the Qallunaat, paper ed

$24.95

Life Among the Qallunaat is the story of Mini Aodla Freeman’s experiences growing up in the Inuit communities of James Bay and her journey in the 1950s from her home to the strange land and stranger customs of the Qallunaat, those living south of the Arctic. Her extraordinary story, sometimes humorous and sometimes heartbreaking, illustrates an Inuit woman’s movement between worlds and ways of understanding. It also provides a clear-eyed record of the changes that swept through Inuit communities in the 1940s and 1950s. Mini Aodla Freeman was born in 1936 on Cape Hope Island in James Bay.

Price: $24.95

My Name Is Arnaktauyok: The Life and Art of Germaine Arnaktauyok, paper ed

$24.95

My Name Is Arnaktauyok: The Life and Art of Germaine Arnaktauyok tells the story of her life in her own words: her very traditional Inuk life growing up in Nunavut at a camp near Igloolik, and her experiences later in a residential school in Chesterfield Inlet; her education as an artist in Winnipeg and Ottawa; and her return to the North, where she continues to create drawings, etchings, and illustrations that have been featured in museums and galleries worldwide. She provides commentary on several of her works, offering a seldom-seen perspective on her inspiration and process.

Price: $24.95

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest, paper ed

$55.95

Jean Barman rewrites the history of the Pacific Northwest from the perspective of the French Canadians involved in the fur economy, the Indigenous women whose presence in their lives encouraged them to stay, and their descendants. For half a century, French Canadians were the region's largest group of newcomers, facilitating early overland crossings, driving the fur economy, initiating non-wholly-Indigenous agricultural settlement, and easing relations with Indigenous people.

Price: $55.95

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