What Does Died Mean?, paper ed

$11.70

What Does Died Mean? Is a bilingual (Navajo and English) picture book that explains the meaning of death in simple terms that a young child can understand. A three-year-old Navajo girl learns about the death of her grandfather through the gentle teaching of her grandmother. The issue of diabetes, proper diet, and the family lifestyle are woven into the story. Through direct question and answer, the grandmother and child come to an understanding of loss and death by means of examples from their surroundings. Soft pastel colour drawings by Patrick G.

Price: $11.70

Living Safe, Playing Safe, paper ed

$10.95

Living Safe, Playing Safe is a children's picture book developed by the Penticton Indian Band Health Department to teach young children about the choices they can make to live healthy. This book in the Caring for Me series discusses ways children can have fun at play and remain safe. Several scenarios make up this book. Several young children play safe in a variety of settings including travelling in a car, in the school playground, and in the kitchen. Riding in a car, the child remembers to buckle the seatbelt.

Price: $10.95

Eat, Run, and Live Healthy, paper ed

$10.95

Eat, Run, and Live Healthy is a children's picture book developed by the Penticton Indian Band Health Department to teach young children about the choices they can make to live healthy. This book in the Caring for Me series discusses eating healthy, exercising, and drinking plenty of water. The book begins in a First Nations classroom as the teacher welcomes the community nurse to make a presentation. Through charts and questions/answers the nurse asks the students about making healthy choices when eating, avoiding junk foods, exercising, and drinking plenty of water each day.

Price: $10.95

Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story, hardcover ed OUT OF PRINT

$0.00

OUT OF PRINT This title is no longer available from the publisher Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story is a traditional legend created by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes as a way to create culturally appropriate fire prevention material. This traditional legend is retold by Johnny Arlee about fire as a gift of the Creator brought by the animals for human beings. Evocative illustrations by Sam Sandoval convey the message of the gift of fire.

Price: $0.00

Whale Rider, The, reprint UNAVAILABLE

$0.00

UNAVAILABLE This title is nolonger available The Whale Rider is the most recent reprint of the novel that inspired the award-winning film of the same name. This 30th anniversary edition incorporates English translations of the Maori text and minor reworking by the author Witi Ihimaera. This is the remarkable story of an eight-year-old girl named Kahu who struggles to fulfill her destiny in a patriarchal culture that says only male heirs may inherit the title of chief. This edition contains 10 colour still photographs from the making of the movie in 2002.

Price: $0.00

Taking Care of Mother Earth, paper ed

$10.95

Taking Care of Mother Earth is a children's picture book developed by the Penticton Indian Band Health Department to teach young children about the choices they can make to help care for the environment. The project develops materials that all children can use that will empower them to make healthy choices. This 8-page, illustrated book tells the simple story of a young boy who assists his grandmother in the kitchen and in the garden. Charlie helps his grandmother as she prepares to preserve healthy fruit such as peaches.

Price: $10.95

Thirteen Moons on Turtle's Back: A Native American Year of Moons, hardcover ed UNAVAILABLE

$0.00

UNAVAILABLE This title is currently unavailable from the publisher. Thirteen Moons on Turtle's Back: A Native American Year of Moons explains the way Native People of North America keep track of the changing seasons. The changing seasons differ in each region of the continent but the pattern of thirteen moons has similar traits among many Nations. In this Joseph Bruchac book, an Abenaki grandfather shows his grandson how to keep track of the changing moons. He uses the scales on the back of the turtle. In counting the scales the boy learns that the number counted equals thirteen.

Price: $0.00

Ken Nieiaka:a Tiatateken:a: The Younger Sister

$19.50

Ken Nieiaka:a Tiatateken:a: The Younger Sister is a Mohawk language resource adapted by Tewateronhiakhwa Mina Beauvais for use by elementary students at Kanehsatake, Quebec. This illustrated story retells a Cree story about two sisters as they make wishes while watching the night sky. The sisters dream about what kind of men they will marry. By choosing one of two stars, the girls make their selections. The younger chooses first and makes an unfortunate selection. The older sister selects the other star which is red.

Price: $19.50

Tsi Nontie:ren Tehakahrowa:nens Ne Kwarero:ha, Tsi Niiawen:en Tsi Tehaha:kwaien Ne Tsitsho, Ateneniahrhon'kowatshon Oka:ra: Why the Owl has Big Eyes, How the Fox Got His Crossed Legs, and The Legend of the Stone Giants

$45.00

Tsi Nontie:ren Tehakahrowa:nens Ne Kwarero:ha, Tsi Niiawen:en Tsi Tehaha:kwaien Ne Tsitsho, Ateneniahrhon'kowatshon Oka:ra: Why the Owl has Big Eyes, How the Fox Got His Crossed Legs, and The Legend of the Stone Giants contains three bilingual Mohawk/English legends retold by Tewateronhiakhwa Mina Beauvais and Konwahawen:se Phyllis Montour. These stories are designed for use by elementary students at Kanehsatake, Quebec. Each story is illustrated with colour drawings and contains Mohawk and English text on each page. The first story recounts a legend about the creation of the birds.

Price: $45.00

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