Field Notes for the Self, paper ed.

$19.95

In Field Notes for the Self by Randy Lundy, a member of the Barren Lands (Cree) First Nation, the poems evoke darkness and light  through ceremony, memory, naming, understanding, truth and meditations through time. Examples of the poems include A Minor Apocalypse, The Definition of Poverty, Seeking, Thinking of Nothing, and others beautifully written through seasons and relationships.
 

Price: $19.95

The Sasquatch, the Fire and the Cedar Baskets, paper ed.

$14.95

The Sasquatch, the Fire and the Cedar Baskets by Joseph Dandurand, a member of Kwantlen First Nation located on the Fraser River and illustrated by Simon Daniel James, an Indigenous artist from the Mamalilikulla/Kwicksutaineuk clans from the Kwakwaka’wakw nation, is told with grace and simplicity by a master storyteller in the great tradition of the Kwantlen people and accompanied by whimsical illustrations from this Kwakwaka’wakw artist. “Deep in the thickest part of a cedar forest there lived a young Sasquatch. He was over nine feet tall and his feet were about size twenty.

Price: $14.95

In Our Own Aboriginal Voices, paper ed.

$18.95

In Our Own Aboriginal Voice 2: A collection of Indigenous Authors & Artists in Canada is edited by Michael Calvet and has a foreword by Edmund Metatawabin. This is a collection of short fiction, memoir, non-fiction, and poetry by Aboriginal writers from across Canada, plus original Aboriginal artwork. This anthology contains the work of established authors such as the late Connie Fife, Joanne Arnott, Michelle Sylliboy, and Dennis Saddleman as well as emerging writers from across Canada.
 

Price: $18.95

ekospi ka ki pekowak / When We Were Alone, Cree and English, hardcover ed.

$21.95

When We Were Alone by David A. Robertson, a member of Norway House Cree Nation and translated by Marsha Blacksmith, a member of Pimicikamak Cree Nation, and illustrated by Julie Flett, Cree-Métis author, illustrator, is an empowering story of resistance that gently introduces children to the history of residential schools in Canada. In When We Were Alone, a young girl notices things about her grandmother that make her curious. As she asks questions, her grandmother tells her about her experiences in a residential school.

Price: $21.95

Bears, paper ed.

$17.95

Bears is a play by Matthew MacKenzie where he is exploring his family’s Cree, Ojibwe and Métis heritage. In Bears a Métis oil sands worker Floyd is making his way westwards along the Trans Mountain pipeline route beginning in Alberta and travelling west to the Pacific watched by the spirit of his mother and others. Little Cub Floyd who has a love for fresh berries, an aversion to authority and a fascination with bears, is outrunning the RCMP after a workplace accident where he is the prime suspect.

Price: $17.95

Five Little Indians, paper ed.

$22.99

Five Little Indians is written by Michelle Good of Cree ancestry and a member of the Red Pheasant Cree Nation in Saskatchewan and whose mother and grandmother were residential school survivors. In Five Little Indians, Kenny, Lucy, Clara, Howie and Maisie are taken from their families when they are very small and sent to a remote, church-run residential school. They are barely out of childhood when they are finally released after years of detention.

Price: $22.99

Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies, paper ed.

$22.95

Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson who is a Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg writer, scholar, and musician, and a member of Alderville First Nation, is a novel that combines narrative and poetic fragments through a careful and fierce reclamation of Anishinaabe aesthetics. In Noopiming, Mashkawaji (they/them) lies frozen in the ice, remembering a long-ago time of hopeless connection and now finding freedom and solace in isolated suspension.

Price: $22.95

C'est fou comme t'as pas l'air d'en être un!, paper ed. French

$21.95

Signée par Sylvie Nicolas, cette traduction du recueil d’essais et de chroniques humoristiques de Drew Hayden Taylor, The Best of Funny, You Don’t Look Like One (Theytus Books, 2015), permet aux francophones de découvrir pour la première fois l’œuvre unique de l’auteur ojibwe. Après avoir fait rire (et réfléchir) de nombreux lecteurs grâce aux quatre tomes de Funny You Don’t Look Like One, Taylor a choisi de rassembler ses meilleurs textes en tant qu’observateur ojibwe aux yeux bleus.

Price: $21.95

Tsoutare', paper ed. French

$16.95

Mes sept histoires existaient peut-être dans un univers métaphysique en attendant que je les pétrisse pour en faire une pâte à conter. Allez savoir! Tous les personnages sont fictifs, bien que certaines situations soient inspirées de faits réels. Mes récits parlent de rencontres, de grands changements et de respect. Tsoutare’ signifie « sept » en wendat. C’est exactement le nombre de mots que l’on trouve dans cet extrait d’une prière navajo : Que tout soit beau autour de  vous.

Price: $16.95

On pleure pas au bingo, paper ed.

$21.95

On pleure pas au bingo par Dawn Dumont (Plains Cree) est traduit par Daniel Grenier. Tout est là : voici la vie sur la réserve, en haute définition. Dawn, la narratrice, revisite sa vie familiale, se replonge dans ses années d’école et s’engage résolument sur la voie de l’avenir. Situé quelque part entre le roman d’apprentissage et le récit autobiographique, On pleure pas au bingo est un livre qui célèbre les différences culturelles et la puissance de la prise de parole par le moyen de ce remède traditionnel et universel qu’est le rire.

Price: $21.95

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