Children's Guide to Arctic Butterflies, A, hardcover ed.

$16.95

A Children's Guide to Arctic Butterflies is a 38-page illustrated information book about the difference between a butterfly and a moth, the anatomy of the butterfly, life cycle, and 12 butterflies of the several dozens found on the tundra of the North American Arctic. This book references staying warm in the Arctic and what butterflies do in winter. The 12 butterflies are: the Palaeno Sulphur, Labrador Sulphur, Hegla Sulphur, American Copper, Arctic Blue, Cranberry Blue, Frigga Fritillary, Dingy Fritillary, Ross's Alpine, Banded Alpine, Polixenes Arctic and Compton Tortoiseshell.

Price: $16.95

Haida: Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture, hardcover ed.

$28.75

Canadian Aboriginal Art And Culture: Haida is one of the titles in Smartbook Media’s series, Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture, published in 2019. Each title in this series provides factual information about a First Nation and is designed for grades five and six. Authors Jennifer Nault and John Willis explain how the Haida Nation have lived and thrived along the Pacific Northwest for more than 8000 years according to archaeologists.

Price: $28.75

Tipiskawi Kisik: Night Sky Star Stories, paper ed.

$14.95

Tipiskawi Kisik: Night Sky Star Stories was researched and published by Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre in 2018.  Author and Cree Knowledge Keeper, Wilfred Buck from the Opaskwayay Cree Nation, works for Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre as a science facilitator and educator. The eight traditional stories included in this 25-page book offer students and teachers oral accounts and perspectives about Cree stars and constellations.

Price: $14.95

Huron: Canadian Aboriginal Art And Culture, hardcover ed.

$28.75

Canadian Aboriginal Art And Culture: Huron is one of the titles in Smartbook Media’s series, Canadian Aboriginal Art and Culture, published in 2019. Each title in this series provides factual information about a First Nation and is designed for grades five and six. Authors Christine Webster and John Willis explain how the French identified this First Nation as Huron referencing the bristle-like hairstyle of Wendat men. The people called themselves Wendat, meaning people of the peninsula.

Price: $28.75

Nibi Emosaawdang / The Water Walker, paperback ed.

$14.95

Nibi Emosaawdang / The Water Walker is a celebration of a determined Ojibwe grandmother Nokomis Josephine and her love for water nibi. After being told about the state of the world’s water and that she needed to do something about this, Nokomis was unsettled. Then she has a dream and the next morning calls her sister and women friends over to talk an idea she has. She and her friends walk to raise awareness of our need to protect Nibi for future generations, and for all life on the planet.

Price: $14.95

Going Back Home, paperback ed.

$19.95

Going Back Home is the story of Noreen’s experiences before and after residential school and foster homes. Through a series of dreams, which at times appear as real life to her, Noreen tries to make sense of all that has happened to her and her family especially her siblings during and after their lives in residential school and foster homes. She questions her indecisiveness; her explicable feeling of inadequacy and her powerlessness.

Price: $19.95

Metis Pioneers, paperback ed.

$45.00

In 'Metis Pioneers' MacKinnon compares the survival strategies of two Métis women - Marie Rose Delorme Smith and Isabella Clark Hardisty Lougheed born during the fur trade – one from the French-speaking free trade tradition and one from the English-speaking Hudson’s Bay Company tradition – who settled in southern Alberta as the fur trade declined in favour of paper trade and a changing social landscape. Born of family involved in the North West Company and the Hudson Bay Company respectively this is the story of their French-Metis and Anglo-Metis lives.

Price: $45.00

What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories of Rebellion and Renewal, paperback ed.

$16.95

Eldon Yellowhorn, is a member of the Piikani Nation and esteemed professor of First Nations studies at Simon Fraser University. He is co-author of Turtle Island, the first book in this series with award-winning Toronto author Kathy Lowinger. They have teamed up again and this time share accounts of the people, places, and events that have mattered to Eldron Yellowhorn in ‘What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous stories of rebellion and renewal’. This colourful and detailed book with reference to multimedia links, highlights key moments in Indigenous history.

Price: $16.95

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