Right to be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet, The, paper ed. 2017 FNCR

$22.00

The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic, and the Whole Planet is a human story of resilience, commitment, and survival told from the unique vantage point of an Inuk woman who, in spite of many obstacles, rose from humble beginnings in the Arctic community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec—where she was raised by a single parent and grandmother and travelled by dog team in a traditional, ice-based Inuit hunting culture—to become one of the most influential and decorated environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world.

Price: $22.00

Testimony: A Memoir, hardcover ed

$35.00

Testimony: A Memoir is the 2016 publication from singer, songwriter Robbie Robertson. On the fortieth anniversary of The Band’s legendary The Last Waltz concert, Robbie Robertson tells his own story of the band that changed music history, his extraordinary personal journey, and his creative friendships with some of the greatest music artists of the last half-century. This memoir, written over five years of reflection, Robbie Robertson employs his unique storyteller’s voice to weave together the journey that led him to some of the most pivotal events in music history.

Price: $35.00

Up Ghost River: A Chief's Journey Through The Turbulent Waters of Native History, paper ed

$22.00

2015 Shortlist Title for First Nation Communities Read. Up Ghost River: A Chief's Journey Through The Turbulent Waters of Native History is a 2014 shortlist nominee for the Governor General’s Literary Awards. This non-fiction book is the powerful and moving memoir from Cree residential school survivor, activist, educator, and writer Edmund Metatawabin. Former Chief of Fort Albany First Nation, Ed Metatawabin presents his compelling account of the experiences endured at the notorious St. Anne residential school, his efforts to expose the wrong doings of St.

Price: $22.00

Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community, paper ed

$16.00

Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community is 2013 title in the Penguin Library of American Indian History Series. Written by Ojibwe scholar Brenda Child the volume offers a wealth of information about the history of Ojibwe women in their communities from contact to present day. Focusing on the Ojibwe of Lake Superior and the Mississippi River the author employs the English translation for mindimooyehn (mature, older woman) one who holds things together as the title and main premise of the book.

Price: $16.00

Reason You Walk, The, hardcover ed 2017 FNCR

$32.00

The Reason You Walk is one of five finalists for the 2016 RBC Taylor Prize for literary non-fiction. 2016 recipient of Kobo Emerging Writer Prize for non-fiction. When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster and musician Wab Kinew (Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation) decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant Ojibwe man who'd raised him. The Reason You Walk spans the year 2012, chronicling painful moments in the past and celebrating renewed hopes and dreams for the future.

Price: $32.00

Up Ghost River: A Chief's Journey Through The Turbulent Waters of Native History, hardcover ed OUT OF STOCK INDEFINITELY

$0.00

OUT OF STOCK INDEFINITELY  2015 Shortlist Title for First Nation Communities Read. Up Ghost River: A Chief's Journey Through The Turbulent Waters of Native History is a 2014 shortlist nominee for the Governor General’s Literary Awards. This non-fiction book is the powerful and moving memoir from Cree residential school survivor, activist, educator, and writer Edmund Metatawabin. Former Chief of Fort Albany First Nation, Ed Metatawabin presents his compelling account of the experiences endured at the notorious St.

Price: $0.00

Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America, The, paper ed

$22.00

The Inconvenient Indian is one of four shortlisted finalists in CODE's (Canadian Organization for Development through Education) 2014 Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature. Thomas King is the second place author of the 2014 Burt Award.  The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the 2013 offering from university professor and humourist Thomas King. With his biting wit and sarcasm, King tells readers a story of Canada’s and America’s relations with First Nations and Native Americans.

Price: $22.00

Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America, The, hardcover ed

$0.00

The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America is the 2012 offering from university professor and humourist Thomas King. With his biting wit and sarcasm, King tells readers a story of Canada’s and America’s relations with First Nations and Native Americans. King takes topics such as Ipperwash, Oka, Bill C-31, American Indian Movement, Treaty 6, Trail of Tears, and Wounded Knee and weaves these and more into a coherent whole. Overall the book comments on the state of Indian-white relations of the past and present.

Price: $0.00

Consumption: A Novel, paper ed

$0.00

Born in the 1950s, Victoria knows nothing but the traditional life of the Inuit until, at age ten, she is sent to a sanitarium to recover from tuberculosis. Six years later, she returns to a radically different world, a stranger to her family and culture. She marries a non-Inuit, Robertson; as their children gravitate toward the pop culture of the mainland, and as her husband exploits the economic opportunities that the Arctic offers, Victoria is torn between her family and her ancestors, between the communal life of the North and the material life of the South.

Price: $0.00

Nation Maker, Sir John A. Macdonald: His Life, Our Times, vol 2, 1867-1891, hardcover ed

$0.00

CURRENTLY OUT OF STOCK  John A. Macdonald, Canada's first prime minister, is the man who made Confederation happen, who is credited with building Canada over the next quarter century, and who shaped what it is today. From Confederation Day in 1867, where this second volume, Nation Maker, Sir John A. Macdonald: His Life, Our Times, picks up, Macdonald finessed a reluctant union of four provinces in central and eastern Canada into a strong nation, despite indifference from Britain and annexationist sentiment in the United States. But it wasn't easy.

Price: $0.00

Pages