First Americans - Indians of the Southwest, The OUT OF STOCK

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The First Americans - Indians of the Southwest is an introduction to the culture area that includes the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Western and Kiowa-Apache; Havasupai; Maricopa; Mohave; Navajo; Pima; the Pueblo; Hopi; Zuni; Tohono O'odham; Walapai; Yaqui; Yavapai; and Yuma Nations. This text takes an anthropological approach to the description of culture area geography, way of life, rituals and religion, and historical change. Written for students in grades 5 to 9, the volume includes 90 archival and contemporary photographs, maps, and an index.

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Day With A Pueblo, A UNAVAILABLE

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A Day With A Pueblo explains what life is like for the Pueblo people of the American Southwest. The book begins like any anthropology text that describes the contemporary cultural lifestyle of the Pueblo of New Mexico. Colourful photographs of contemporary village life and the geography make this factual section interesting for students in grades five to seven. Part two of the book presents a glimpse of the daily life of an Elder and his family who live at Taos Pueblo. The man and his family are preparing for a holiday and he reminisces about his tribe's history.

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Day With A Mimbres, A OUT OF PRINT

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OUT OF PRINT A Day With A Mimbres explains what life was like for the ancestors of the Pueblo people who lived in what is now southwestern United States. The book begins like any anthropology text that describes the cultural lifestyle of the Mimbres around 1130 A.D. Colourful photographs of artifacts and geography make this factual section interesting for students in grades five to seven. Part two of the book presents a glimpse of the daily life of a man and his family. The man is preparing for a journey to a religious centre.

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Reaping The Whirlwind - The Apache Wars OUT OF PRINT

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Reaping The Whirlwind - The Apache Wars is an historical overview of the Apache and their early contact with European Americans from the 1400s to 1886. The text examines each of the major battles and significant people (including Victorio and Geronimo) that played a role in the efforts of the Apache to maintain their freedom. Includes 24 archival photographs, maps, highlighted features about important topics and individuals, and a bibliography. Part of the Library of American Indian History Series, Reaping the Whirlwind is designed for students in grades 7 to 12.

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Kinaalda - A Navajo Girl Grows Up, 3rd printing, paper ed

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Kinaalda - A Navajo Girl Grows Up is the story of a thirteen-year-old Navajo girl as she prepares and participates in her coming-of-age ceremony. This traditional ceremony is still held by modern-day Navajo and the book shows one family's role in their daughter's Kinaalda. The text explains the origin of the ceremony and how an urban family observes it on the Navajo Reservation. Writer and photographer Monty Roessel is a Navajo freelance photographer. His sensitive text and colour images convey the importance of Elders in passing on traditional knowledge to the younger generation.

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Children of Clay - A Family of Pueblo Potters, paper ed

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Children of Clay - A Family of Pueblo Potters is an intimate and engaging look at the Santa Clara Pueblo family of potters from northern New Mexico. Rina Swentwell who comes from a large family of Pueblo potters writes this insider's view for young readers. The colour photographs and informative text follow Gia Rose, a great-grandmother, as she shows her grandchildren the step-by-step process of creating the distinctive Southwest pottery. The traditional story of how pottery came to the people is included. Maps, glossary, and bibliography are also provided.

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Unsung Heroes of World War II: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers OUT OF PRINT

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OUT OF PRINT This title is no longer available through GoodMinds.com Unsung Heroes of World War II:The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers is the remarkable story of Navajo Marines who during World War II assured the Allied victory using Navajo Code. This complex code based on the Navajo language was developed as a means of communication for the US military. The original 29 Navajo soldiers who developed the code are profiled. Their work went unrecognized until 1969. The Navajo Code was never deciphered by the Japanese and is credited for the US victory at Iwo Jima.

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Native North American Art, paper ed

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Native North American Art is part of the Oxford History of Art Series and this volume sets out to examine and describe the current state of the arts in contemporary Canada and the United States. Berlo and Phillips are two art historians who bring impeccable credentials to the task. The text introduces to readers an appreciation for the richness and diversity of Indigenous arts from its earliest forms to the installations of modern artists.

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